Indoor Safety

Indoor Safety

Home Safety

Toy Safety 

Safe Sleep

Home Safety

Your baby or toddler likely spends a lot of their time at home. Knowing this, it is important to make sure that your home is safe for them to explore and move around.

Keep in mind, no safety measures can make a house completely safe. Active supervision is important to protect your child!

Go through your home and check that the following are safe:

  • electrical outlets
  • safety gates and barriers
  • kitchen
  • bathroom
  • living room or family room
  • baby's room

For more detailed information, visit the Canadian Pediatric Society and Health Canada.

Did you know? Young children are usually injured in the home. Half of all hospitalizations for children under 6 are due to a fall injury.

Falling on stairs can seriously injure your child.  The right safety gate will help to protect your child:

  • Check with Health Canada to make sure your safety gates meet current standards.
  • Follow manufacturer's instructions.
  • Install gates at the top and bottom of each staircase.

Make sure the gate at the top of the stairs is well-anchored (do not use a pressure gate).

Toy Safety

It may seem like your child always wants to play. Did you know children learn through play? Different types of toys and play will help with your child's development. With so many toys to choose from, do you know which ones are safe for your child?

According to Health Canada, it is important when buying toys to make sure:

  • The toys are for the right age (toys for older children often have parts that are too small for children under 3 years of age)
  • To read and follow age labels, warnings, safety messages and instructions that come with the toy
  • To look for sturdy, well-made toys
  • To look for toys that come with the maker's contact information

After buying toys:

  • Always watch your child. Teach them how to use toys in a safe way.
  • Remove and throw out all toy packaging like plastic bags, plastic wrap, foam, staples and ties. Also remove and throw out any plastic film coverings. A child can suffocate or choke on these.
  • Keep all toys, like plush and soft toys, away from heat sources. The toys could catch fire, causing injury.
  • Check toys often for loose parts, broken pieces or sharp edges. Repair or throw out any broken toys.
  • Remove mobiles and toy bars from cribs as soon as your baby begins to push up on their hands and knees.

For more information on safe play time, visit Health Canada.

Do you have more questions?

 

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